WE ARE NOT RACISTS, FASCISTS, NAZIS!

We have said this for nearly twenty years, but people still keep asking if we are NAZIS.

No! We are not racist. No! We are not Fascists. No! We are not Nazis. People seem to look no further than the symbol of our Faith before they come out with the assumption that we are the above. If people took the time to read about our organisation, then they would come to the logical conclusion that we have no hatred within our doctrines.

The symbol we use isn’t even a Swastika. Even if it was, the History behind the symbols the Nazis appropriated is far less destructive. If you search through historical documents you will find that the symbol was used as far back as 4000 B.C. and it is still used in many parts of Asia.

We are not here to defend the Nazis but we are here to enlighten you on the symbol. We use a Triskele or Triskelion. It does not, and never has been associated with fascism.

The symbol on our website doesn’t represent anything akin to fascism. If you had read the doctrines of the faith then you will find that there are ZERO references to race.

The reason we are now, once again, writing about these issues is that our leader, Lord Avatar II, had a visit from the Greater Manchester Police, who wanted to discuss with him about the faith-based primarily on a report which said “we could pose a danger to society” and they wanted to know who was involved in the faith.

Our leader told officers the above and they seemed to be understanding of what he was saying. This doesn’t excuse the fact that after all these years, there are still people trying to tar us and get us shut down in some respect.

If the police are so interested in investigating possible threatening organisations, we suggest they check out ANTIFA (Pictured Above) and other organisations like them in the future.

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The Physics of Death

In life, the human body comprises matter and energy. That energy is both electrical (impulses and signals) and chemical (reactions). The same can be said about plants, which are powered by photosynthesis, a process that allows them to generate energy from sunlight.

But what if instead of looking at death from a biological perspective, we examine it from a physics standpoint? More specifically, let’s look at how our energy is redistributed after we die.

Even though it’s an inexorable part of life, for many people, death — or at least the thought of ceasing to exist forever — can be a scary thing. The disturbing things that happen to the body during decomposition — the process by which cells and tissues begin to break down post mortem — are bad enough.

When we die, our energy is redistributed throughout the universe according to the law of conservation of energy. While this should not be confused with our consciousness living forever, our energy continuing after we’re gone could make death a less scary prospect.

The process of energy generation is much more complex in humans, though. Remarkably, at any given moment, roughly 20 watts of energy course through your body — enough to power a light bulb — and this energy is acquired in a plethora of ways. Mostly, we get it through the consumption of food, which gives us chemical energy. That chemical energy is then transformed into kinetic energy that is ultimately used to power our muscles.

As we know through thermodynamics, energy cannot be destroyed. It simply changes states. The total amount of energy in an isolated system does not, and cannot, change. And thanks to Einstein, we also know that matter and energy are two rungs on the same ladder.

The universe as a whole is closed. However, human bodies (and other ecosystems) are not closed — they’re open systems. We exchange energy with our surroundings. We can gain energy (again, through chemical processes), and we can lose it (by expelling waste or emitting heat).

In death, the collection of atoms of which you are composed (a universe within the universe) are repurposed. Those atoms and that energy, which originated during the creation of the Universe, will always be around. Therefore, your “light,” that is, the essence of your energy — not to be confused with your actual consciousness — will continue to echo throughout space until the end of time.

German Scientists Prove Life After Death

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Berlin | A team of psychologists and medical doctors associated with the Technische Universität of Berlin, have announced this morning that they had proven by clinical experimentation, the existence of some form of life after death. This astonishing announcement is based on the conclusions of a study using a new type of medically supervised near-death experiences, that allow patients to be clinically dead for almost 20 minutes before being brought back to life.

This controversial process that was repeated on 944 volunteers over that last four years, necessitates a complex mixture of drugs including epinephrine and dimethyltryptamine, destined to allow the body to survive the state of clinical death and the reanimation process without damage. The body of the subject was then put into a temporary comatic state induced by a mixture of other drugs which had to be filtered by ozone from his blood during the reanimation process 18 minutes later.

The extremely long duration of the experience was only recently made possible by the development of a new cardiopulmonary recitation (CPR) machine called the AutoPulse. This type of equipment has already been used over the last few years, to reanimate people who had been dead for somewhere between 40 minutes to an hour.

The team of scientists led by Dr Berthold Ackermann, has monitored the operations and have compiled the testimonies of the subjects. Although there are some slight variations from one individual to another, all of the subjects have some memories of their period of clinical death. and a vast majority of them described some very similar sensations.

Most common memories include a feeling of detachment from the body, feelings of levitation, total serenity, security, warmth, the experience of absolute dissolution, and the presence of an overwhelming light.

The scientists say that they are well aware the many of their conclusions could shock a lot of people, like the fact that the religious beliefs of the various subjects seems to have held no incidence at all, on the sensations and experiences that they described at the end of the experiment. Indeed, the volunteers counted in their ranks some members are a variety of Christian churches, Muslims, Jews, Hindus and atheists.

“I know our results could disturb the beliefs of many people” says Mr Ackermann. “But in a way, we have just answered one of the greatest questions in the history of mankind, so I hope these people will be able to forgive us. Yes, there is life after death and it looks like this applies to everyone.”


 

How Christianity Changed Pagan Europe

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It was not easy for Christianity to spread around a pagan Europe that was mostly under the cruel Roman control. It emerged as a Jewish sect and contradicted the Roman theology in its every little aspect, which was quite dangerous back in those days. Rome was promoting an idea where people were slaves or vassals of the empire, while Christianity promoted the idea of human freedom, an unimaginable concept in those times. In front of one Almighty God, everyone was equal, poor or rich, weak or strong, as God loves everyone. But the Romans fought with everything they got these ideas, which were abominable in their opinion, trying to exterminate Christianity from the territories they controlled.

But something amazing happened in Europe. The harder the Romans tried to extinguish the flame of Christianity, the greater the fire became, as this new formed religion was starting to grow in popularity. Around 135 CE, following the downfall of Bar Kochba, Christianity started to spread around Europe at an incredible speed. It took less than 100 years for a third of the Roman Empire to become Christian. Of course, this didn’t come without a price, as Christians were persecuted with cruelty by the Romans, who saw this religion as the ultimate offence brought to the empire’s Caesars, finding even the smallest reasons to publicly torture and execute Christians. But, from 260 to 360CE, the Roman Empire started to decline. The persecution of Christians did not help the pagan empire at all, as this only made Christianity more popular among common people, who were tired of the oppression unrolled by the Romans.

Christianity impacted the life of pagan Europeans at a significant degree, bringing customers and ideas that never existed before. In a world where women were considered worthless, except in the case of Jewish people, Christianity managed to give women hope, allowing them to believe in their goals and ambitions. Also, Christianity changed a lot the perception over sexuality as well. In both the Roman and Greek empires, sexuality was seen as a part of human’s nature, as normal as eating and sleeping. It was part of a natural and healthy society, not being condemned at all, as it was believed that people don’t have full control over their sexuality, being both mysterious and important. Thus, homosexuality was seen as normal in the pagan world, although it was still discriminated in a certain degree.

When it came to Christianity, sexuality was part of the moral identity of humans, being completely controllable and within the range of our free will. Of course, Christianity saw some pagan sexual practices as demonic, and we make reference here at homosexuality, which is completely forbidden and against human nature by the Christian religion. So, by introducing morality to the intimate lives of people, Christianity promoted the fact that sexuality is not a form of entertainment, as it was left in the world as a mean to procreate. Thus, intimate relationships outside of a marriage were not allowed, together with sexual relations between two persons of the same sex, and there were also rules about pre-marital sex, which were similar to the ones that existed in Rome and Greece as well, in spite of the fact that they followed pagan religions.