Domestic Violence Affects Men Too

In today’s society it is common to only think of domestic abuse as affecting women, however, statistically speaking there are far more men being abused. The difference is that men are far less likely to report such abuse for one reason or another.

For me, speaking from experience, I was in an abusive relationship around ten years ago. She would stop me from talking to certain friends, she would constantly want to know who was texting and ringing my phone, she would even go through messages to make sure that I wasn’t being “Naughty with other girls.”

We didn’t officially live with each other, she had a flat somewhere and I had my own, but she wanted to be with me 24 hours a day, so when I wasn’t staying at hers she would be staying at mine. I remember her staying at my flat one night and I was speaking with the next door neighbour – who was a woman – I looked up at my spare bedroom window in horror as I saw her watching me talk to her. When she saw me she moved away from the window and I had to quickly wrap up my conversation with the woman. I walked up the stairs in dread as I didn’t know what she was going to say or do. We had an argument and she put her fist through my bedroom door.

I moved from my flat to another one around the corner and at the time I had to have mental health staff from the NHS visit me on a regular basis. It was on such a day that they were due to come round that my Girlfriend wanted to check my phone, I had no choice but to let her and she didn’t like what she saw. An argument ensued which resulted in her assaulting me so bad that blood began to drip from the side of my head. The NHS Staff came in to witness the aftermath of the assault. Whilst I was being seen to be the staff, she packed up things in my flat. She even took food knowing that I had no money to replace it.

I was embarrassed by the whole thing and didn’t want to get her into trouble at the time so I never reported it. Shortly afterwards I split up with her for good but she gave me a dire warning, that if I didn’t reconsider there would be consequences, but I shrugged it off. It’s been ten years and this woman still tried to control me and do damage to my life one way or the other. It’s a desperate situation that I have been subjected to.

The point of this is that men need to recognise and report the signs of domestic abuse. Do not fall into the way of thinking that it is embarrassing. If you are suffering from domestic abuse you should report it. There are a number of places you can get help.

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/abuse/help-for-men-who-are-being-abused.htm

https://www.webmd.com/balance/features/help-for-battered-men#1

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-abuse-how-to-get-help

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The Physics of Death

In life, the human body comprises matter and energy. That energy is both electrical (impulses and signals) and chemical (reactions). The same can be said about plants, which are powered by photosynthesis, a process that allows them to generate energy from sunlight.

But what if instead of looking at death from a biological perspective, we examine it from a physics standpoint? More specifically, let’s look at how our energy is redistributed after we die.

Even though it’s an inexorable part of life, for many people, death — or at least the thought of ceasing to exist forever — can be a scary thing. The disturbing things that happen to the body during decomposition — the process by which cells and tissues begin to break down post mortem — are bad enough.

When we die, our energy is redistributed throughout the universe according to the law of conservation of energy. While this should not be confused with our consciousness living forever, our energy continuing after we’re gone could make death a less scary prospect.

The process of energy generation is much more complex in humans, though. Remarkably, at any given moment, roughly 20 watts of energy course through your body — enough to power a light bulb — and this energy is acquired in a plethora of ways. Mostly, we get it through the consumption of food, which gives us chemical energy. That chemical energy is then transformed into kinetic energy that is ultimately used to power our muscles.

As we know through thermodynamics, energy cannot be destroyed. It simply changes states. The total amount of energy in an isolated system does not, and cannot, change. And thanks to Einstein, we also know that matter and energy are two rungs on the same ladder.

The universe as a whole is closed. However, human bodies (and other ecosystems) are not closed — they’re open systems. We exchange energy with our surroundings. We can gain energy (again, through chemical processes), and we can lose it (by expelling waste or emitting heat).

In death, the collection of atoms of which you are composed (a universe within the universe) are repurposed. Those atoms and that energy, which originated during the creation of the Universe, will always be around. Therefore, your “light,” that is, the essence of your energy — not to be confused with your actual consciousness — will continue to echo throughout space until the end of time.

German Scientists Prove Life After Death

ancient antique art death

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Berlin | A team of psychologists and medical doctors associated with the Technische Universität of Berlin, have announced this morning that they had proven by clinical experimentation, the existence of some form of life after death. This astonishing announcement is based on the conclusions of a study using a new type of medically supervised near-death experiences, that allow patients to be clinically dead for almost 20 minutes before being brought back to life.

This controversial process that was repeated on 944 volunteers over that last four years, necessitates a complex mixture of drugs including epinephrine and dimethyltryptamine, destined to allow the body to survive the state of clinical death and the reanimation process without damage. The body of the subject was then put into a temporary comatic state induced by a mixture of other drugs which had to be filtered by ozone from his blood during the reanimation process 18 minutes later.

The extremely long duration of the experience was only recently made possible by the development of a new cardiopulmonary recitation (CPR) machine called the AutoPulse. This type of equipment has already been used over the last few years, to reanimate people who had been dead for somewhere between 40 minutes to an hour.

The team of scientists led by Dr Berthold Ackermann, has monitored the operations and have compiled the testimonies of the subjects. Although there are some slight variations from one individual to another, all of the subjects have some memories of their period of clinical death. and a vast majority of them described some very similar sensations.

Most common memories include a feeling of detachment from the body, feelings of levitation, total serenity, security, warmth, the experience of absolute dissolution, and the presence of an overwhelming light.

The scientists say that they are well aware the many of their conclusions could shock a lot of people, like the fact that the religious beliefs of the various subjects seems to have held no incidence at all, on the sensations and experiences that they described at the end of the experiment. Indeed, the volunteers counted in their ranks some members are a variety of Christian churches, Muslims, Jews, Hindus and atheists.

“I know our results could disturb the beliefs of many people” says Mr Ackermann. “But in a way, we have just answered one of the greatest questions in the history of mankind, so I hope these people will be able to forgive us. Yes, there is life after death and it looks like this applies to everyone.”